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How Do You Help Someone With Mental Health Issues?

So what can you do if you, or someone you care about, is struggling with their mental health?

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Look Out for Early Signs

If they become withdrawn, or show increased drug and alcohol use, disinterest in activities, disinterest in looking after themselves, changes in appetite, or moodiness, be aware that these could be early signs. Even if they don’t want help, and you may worry they’ll hate you for it, it’s better to try and get professional help as early as possible, as early diagnosis and management could mean it’s a one off experience rather than something which troubles them for life!

Talk About It!

There’s a campaign in support of ending mental health discrimination, and their big focus is on just getting on and talking about it. So you don’t have to be a doctor or mental health expert to talk to someone about their mental health. Think of it as if your friend is constantly going back to an abusive relationship – would we let them carry on going through the same cycles and just watch from the side-lines? Or would we try to talk to them about what they’re doing, in case they haven’t seen the bigger picture of what’s happening to them?

It’s the same with mental health issues – if you really care about someone, try to talk to them about their situation. Not in a judgemental way, and don’t do it when you’re feeling frustrated, angry, or emotional about the situation. Make a note to try and ask them in a relaxed way if they are aware of some of their peculiar behaviours, and also ask them if they need any help in working through some of their issues, or would like to be supported in seeking medical advice. They may need a lot of reassurance that help will be given, rather than that they will be locked up!

I know for my friend that even though he is aware of his illness and that some of what he thinks and worries about is not true, he still often thinks that the medicine he has to take will kill him (that someone is trying to poison him). Being able to talk about this and being offered reassurance and encouragement to take medicine which, when he is well he knows he wants to take, makes the world of difference between him being able to maintain his current level of manageable symptoms, or going off the meds, starting an unravelling of the current state into an unmanageable issue, and worst case, need for hospitalisation (which he desperately doesn’t want).

For someone who is on the periphery of the situation, not involved with day to day care or relationships, it’s still good to really ask how your friend is! My friend is often nervous to come out with us for fear that people will notice ‘how weird he behaves.’ After I’ve asked him how he is feeling, or how he felt the other day when we all went out, he might say he’s struggling with hiding his thoughts, or that he felt sick and that everyone was looking at him, in which point I can genuinely reassure him that I really thought he’d done well and I hadn’t noticed that he was struggling. Or during an evening if I notice he’s looking a bit uncomfortable, it’s great to just say ‘hey, how are you feeling?’ and let him know it’s absolutely fine if he feels he needs to leave, or to tell him that he’s doing well etc. Why would we avoid talking about this when he can really benefit from that extra support?

What’s more, my girlfriend who is dating my friend who suffers, has said that caring for someone who has serious mental health issues can be very time consuming, and having a group of people who can offer support can be a huge help – from attending appointments with him, to sitting at home with him so he isn’t alone when she needs to go out etc.

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